SharePoint Server 2013 Advanced Solutions (70-332) Part 2

Part 2 of 3 in the SharePoint Server 2013 Advanced Solutions (70-332) series. This series focuses on the planning and implementing phases of all aspects of SharePoint 2013.
Course info
Rating
(70)
Level
Advanced
Updated
Jun 24, 2013
Duration
5h 11m
Table of contents
Plan a Social Workload
Plan a Search Workload
Plan and Configure Web Content Management
Plan and Configure Enterprise Content Management
Create and Configure App Management
Create and Configure Productivity Service
Create and Configure Conversion Services
Configure Service Application Federation
Description
Course info
Rating
(70)
Level
Advanced
Updated
Jun 24, 2013
Duration
5h 11m
Description

Part 2 of 3 in the SharePoint Server 2013 Advanced Solutions (70-332) series. This series focuses on the planning and implementing phases of all aspects of SharePoint 2013. This course is intended for advanced users who are looking to gain knowledge for the 70-332 exam. We will start with a bare bones environment, and begin to build and plan through SQL, SharePoint, and the Services, until our entire environment is configured; based on our demo company, Globomantics, requests.

About the author
About the author

Jeff previously worked at Microsoft for over 8 years in MSIT going through multiple release cycles of SharePoint, Exchange, Groove, Office and Lync.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Plan a Social Workload
Welcome to the next lesson. In this one what we're going to do is we're going to go over Plan a Social Workload. Now this is a really cool lesson. And I want to take a moment to explain why I'm going to love this so much. I want to go way back in history now. I want to go to SharePoint 2007. SharePoint 2007 when it was created was great because it had taken SharePoint away from just being a content management system to actually being a full-fledged collaboration system. So it gave us this really good ability now to start collaborating amongst ourselves with a ton of new tools inside of it. Well we go from there and we move to SharePoint 2010. There were a lot of upgrades that were done. We've got the SharePoint Management Shell that was put in place with PowerShell. We've got a lot of automation sets. A lot of major things. The user profile from the SSP was changed. So all these things come along, and they get changed. But they're really being changed for the main site collections. Now My Sites were changed, but they didn't get as much of an upgrade really. They got some tagging, things along those lines, and they were able to put up some _____ but not really true collaboration that we're used to when we go out into our social networks. We move on from there into 2013. And 2013 this turned around and went, Well, we're bringing social back. And we're bringing it back with a vengeance. So they came in with a lot of great things, a lot of new functionalities to make sure that people cannot only work together, they can join each other in groups. There's a ton of things they can do. And we do this by having these communities. And that's what I want to start talking about. I want to talk first and foremost about communities before we talk about My Sites. So let's jump over to that. We're going to talk for a moment on that one.

Plan and Configure Web Content Management
Welcome back to the next lesson. Today we're going to go over Plan and Configure Web Content Management. Now, we have to remember all the way back to when SharePoint was just in its inception because at that point in time, it really was a CMS, it was a content management system. And a lot of what it was doing and people were utilizing it for and are still today in some situations was more of a replacement for our public folders, somewhere where we could get them from any device, whatever we needed to do. But it grew over a period of time. And it grew from a simple collaboration management system into this true collaboration system. But these things still have their content management based in them. And one of the content managements, of course, is web content management. We're going to go over that in this lesson. Now the web content management is going to talk about how we publish, what are our publishing sites, what do we have available to us? And 2013 has really grown up with this because if we remember previously, we had good web content management. We did, but we were so limited. We were in our little site collection buckets, and we could never leave them. Farms were farms, site collections were site collections, and _____ talk across each other. And all these things like that. Well 2013 has decided to kind of knock down all those barriers in a multitude of ways. So I want to start with one of the ones that I love. And I want to start, and we're going to go talk about channels because I'm really glad this appeared. And we'll talk about in one sec on why. So let's go do that.

Plan and Configure Enterprise Content Management
Hi! Welcome to Plan and Configure Enterprise Content Management. Today, that's exactly what we're going to be going over, the enterprise content management. Now before we jump into the slides for a moment, let's think about this. What is enterprise content management? Because when we think about content management, we're thinking, How are we dealing with our documents? Well enterprise content management is exactly that, but it's more a suite of tools that are there to assist us in doing this. And those tools have things like eDiscovery, record keeping, archiving, routing, and so on and so forth. These tools are available in SharePoint to make this so much easier on us to deal with our content management. So let's jump in and take a look at one of those tools.

Create and Configure Productivity Service
Hi! Thanks for joining me for this lesson. In today's lesson, we're going to go over Create and Configure Productivity Services. Now what exactly are productivity services? Well in this case, productivity services are the services that help us help the end user. Now it sounds kind of strange phrasing it that way, but productivity services take the services that allow us to render content for the user. When we look at SharePoint, and we look at the things the users do, there's a really big boy out there, and that's part of the productivity services. So we're going to talk about that one first. So take a moment and think for a second, What do our users, when they're out there and they're working inside of SharePoint, besides just uploading and downloading, what service do you think that they actually use the most? Hold onto that thought, and let's go jump over to it.

Create and Configure Conversion Services
Hi! Welcome back. In today's lesson what we're going to do is we're going to go over Create and Configure Conversion Services. So what are conversion services? Well conversion services are still part of our productivity services, they are. But they're a specific group that allows us to actually go and in bulk convert documents of different types. Now some of these come from 2010, and some of these are new to 2013. And these are what we're going to talk about. We're going to talk about how we go through this based on the scenario to go through its settings. Now for those of you who are getting a little nervous because, if you remember, the last lesson was fairly long because there were a lot of things we had to look at. Good news--in this lesson, it's not going to be as long. There're not as many settings to configure. We should be able to go through this a lot quicker, but we still need to know this stuff. It's still just as important because the settings are just as valuable as the settings from the original three. So the original three we talked about in last lesson, Productivity Services, those dealt with, How do we render this information to the user? Calculate the values? Things along those lines. And now we're going to talk about how we take these documents and convert them into different types. So let's go look at what the first service is.

Configure Service Application Federation
Hi! For those of you who are just joining us, thanks for coming on board. And for those of you who have been following the lessons all the way through, welcome back for another one. Today what we're going to do is we're going to go through Configure Service Application Federation. So what does this actually mean? Well we know configuring our service applications, we've done that. But federation. Federation's a really unique one in that what we're trying to do is create a centralized service that can propagate out to other areas. So when I talk about federation, I use an example a lot of times. And what I use is Active Directory. And the reason I use Active Directory is because it does all of our authentication, it does our computers, we've got our DCs, and a ton of things that combine with all that. All that to the side, it's still a centralized service. No matter what type of environment we're creating inside of that domain, in that forest structure, we are still using that service. That's a federated service. It's a federated model. But what does this mean inside of SharePoint?