SQL Server 2012 Database Administration (70-462) Part 3

Part 3 of 3 in the SQL Server 2012 Database Administration (70-462) series. This SQL Server 2012 administration course covers how to configure and maintain an enterprise data management system.
Course info
Rating
(331)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Oct 30, 2012
Duration
4h 51m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Rating
(331)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Oct 30, 2012
Duration
4h 51m
Description

Part 3 of 3 in the SQL Server 2012 Database Administration (70-462) series. This SQL Server 2012 administration course covers how to configure and maintain an enterprise data management system. You'll learn SQL profiler, SQL server agent, basic high availability principles, and proper management of data and log files. If you're new to SQL Server administration, you'll benefit from this introduction as it introduces you to a broad range of topics.

About the author
About the author

Sean McCown is a Microsoft Certified Master in SQL Server 2008. He is also a SQL Server MVP with over 15 years experience in databases.

More from the author
Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Restore Basics
Hey everybody, and welcome to TrainSignal. Now we're going to talk about some restore basics. So restoring your database clearly is just as important as backing it up, because if you can't restore it, then you don't have a backup, and just like backup, there are a lot of nuances in the restores, and how the different restore options play together with the different backup options, and how they all work together in certain situations, and this is another one of those things that you're going to find that you could be doing this for 20 years, and you're still going to be learning things about backup and restore. Because there are so many different situations, and so many nuances in the way that these things play together, I find that I still find every now and then a different way to apply a certain type of restore, or some hidden little functionality in the way something plays with a certain recovery model, or with some other backup flag, or some other restore flag, so, there's lots of nuance in here. I'm going to be able to show you the basics today to get you going. You should learn everything you need to know today about how to restore the backups that you've already been taking.

Basic Execution Plans
Hey everybody, and welcome to TrainSignal. Okay, let's talk execution plans. Now execution plans are the way that SQL Server queries your data, and you've got indexes on the table, you may have several indexes on the table, so which means you have different access paths, and of course you have joins, and functions, and all different types of things on your table primary and foreign keys, and how SQL Server chooses to get to your data that you've asked for in the query is called an execution plan, and SQL exposes that to you so you can see if it's using the most efficient method possible. Or actually, I should put that another way. It's probably using the most efficient method possible for what you asked for. What execution plans really show you is whether or not you are asking for the data in the most efficient method possible. A lot of times that's going to mean adding, or altering an index, but sometimes it's also going to mean changing the way that you're writing a query. But no matter what the fix, execution plans show you what's going on.

Database Mail
Hey everybody, and welcome to TrainSignal. It's time to talk about Database Mail. Now Database Mail is just what it sounds like. It's SQL Server's method for sending SMTP emails, and it really represents a huge leap forward for us in the SQL world, because back in SQL 2000 we used to have to actually have the Outlook Client installed on our SQL Servers in order to send mail, and that requirement just isn't there anymore. Now, I could start off this discussion with giving you a nice overview of the Database Mail architecture, and how it's done, and how it does what it needs to do, and all of the tables that are involved, and everything, but you know that stuff really isn't important. I've supported database now for years now, and other than just for my own information, I've almost never needed to know all of that internal stuff. So, what I'm going to concentrate on here is getting you up and running in Database Mail, teach you the concepts that you need to know in order to make the big decisions, and then send you on your way. So with that, let's just have a really quick overview of more or less how Database Mail is designed. So Database Mail was designed to be a very robust, and resilient system by using profiles, as you'll see in just a few minutes. You can move your Database Mail scenario from one server to another. So you can move it from dev, to QA, to test, and into prod, and anywhere else you need to, without having to change any of the code that relies on those profiles. So it's a very good way to obscure the details of the implementation from the code that calls it, and it also has a decent little level of security wrapped around it as well.

Importing and Exporting Data
Hey everybody, and welcome to TrainSignal. We're going to talk about importing and exporting data, because as DBAs we get called on all the time to move huge amounts of data from one server to another, and it's really good to know the best way to do that. So of course the first thing I need to tell you right away is that I can't really tell you the best way to move data from one server to another, because most situations have something special about them that make every technique viable, but I can show you how to use the different methods, and give you a little guidance along the way so that you can make your own decisions.

High Availability Basics
Hi everybody, and welcome to TrainSignal. Now we're going to talk about high availability basics, and HA is one of those things that people build their entire careers on. It's so complex, and there's just so much to it, so many different vast areas you can get into that you really can build a career off of it. So, this is just going to be a survey course of the major HA technologies. I'll do a quick demo of one of them, but there's just no way that I could cover anything so incredibly vast in a single lesson, or even in a single 10-hour course I couldn't cover the vastness of a technology like that.